Is one of your goals to write a book or poetry? Mine is! Maybe these 12 ways to write a poem could help you accomplish that goal.

How to Write Poetry

From the November 2001 issue of O, The Oprah Magazine

Did you know that poems take root in the found objects and slammed doors of everyday life? You can write one. Really! Honor Moore leads the way.

Let’s say I’m sitting in that room with you now. Take out a pad and pen, your favorite pen—the one that just slides across the paper. Be sure you have an hour or so, so you can take your time with each prompt. 12 Ways to Write a Poem

 

  1. Make a list of five things you did today, in the order you did them.
  2. Quickly write down three colors.
  3. Write down a dream. If you can’t remember one, make it up.
  4. Take 15 minutes to write an early childhood memory, using language a child would use.
  5. Write a forbidden thought, to someone who would understand.
  6. Write a forbidden thought, to someone who would not.
  7. Make a list of five of your favorite “transitional objects.” Choose one and describe it in detail.
  8. Write down three questions you’d ask as if they were the last questions you could ever ask.
  9. Write down an aphorism (e.g. “A stitch in time saves nine”).
  10. Write down three slant rhymes, pairs of words that share one or two consonants rather than vowels (moon/mine and long/thing are slant rhymes).
  11. Write three things people have said to you in the past 48 hours. Quote them as closely as you can.
  12. Write the last extreme pain you had, emotional or physical. If the pain were an animal, what animal would it be? Describe the animal.

Tips

No human experience is unique, but each of us has a way of putting language together that is ours alone.

Read more: http://www.oprah.com/spirit/12-Ways-to-Write-a-Poem#ixzz1YozCvyLE

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